Marine radios recommended for local fishermen

Marine radios recommended for local fishermen

Marine radios are being recommended by the head of the Marine Police Unit, John Preville, for fishermen going out to sea.

Superintendent Preville said he would strongly recommend that fishermen use the devises when venturing out.

The Marine Police Commander made the comments after announcing that a fishing vessel from Anse La Raye that had been reported missing at sea, had been spotted by a French aircraft.

Tso men on board were rescued and the vessel was abandoned.

The vessel had been reported missing on Thursday, June 30, 2016 by relatives of the two men on board, after the boat did not return home.

A French aircraft spotted the boat on Saturday, July 2, 2016 at about 6:20 pm.

The vessel and its two-man crew were some 106 nautical miles off Fort de France.

The two men on board were airlifted to hospital in Martinique and are expected back home shortly.

Superintendent Preville explained that with the use of mobile telephones, the fishermen cannot be contacted between Saint Lucia and Martinique.

He observed that with Marine radios, there are other vessels using the same channel 16.

The Marine Police Commander noted that once information is transmitted via the Marine radio, others are able to hear.

He said this would assist in quicker rescues.

Preville noted that when fishermen go missing at sea and aircraft have to mount search and rescue operations, it is very costly.

He suggested that with the use of both mobile telephone and Marine radios, if one device does not work the other can be used.

 

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1 Comment

  1. The Commentator
    July 6, 2016 at 9:21 pm Reply

    I thought it was a legal requirement under the Fisheries Regulations for each seaworthy vessel to be equipped with a marine radio. If it is not a legal requirement then we must amend the Regulations ASAP.
    On the use of radios for communications why is it that the RSLPF continues to rely on mobile phones for telecommunications instead of a dedicated encrypted police telecom network of walkie-talkies, repeaters and base stations? Perhaps the Police Force should lead by example on the issue of emergency and operational telecommunications as how will police communicate with each other if, God forbid, the landline and mobile phone networks fail?

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