Help offered to suicide victim’s daughter

The law firm, Cyril Landers and Associates, has reached out to help  21 year old Chantal Marshall, the daughter of suicide victim, Cecilia Daniel Marshall, 43,with an offer of employment.

Cecilia Daniel Marshall, who was reported to be overwhelmed by several problems including the recent death of her husband, financial woes and the challenge of coping with cancer, died last night at Victoria Hospital after consuming a poisonous substance yesterday morning at Desglo.

cecilia-daniel-marshall

(Cecilia Daniel Marshall)

Her daughter Chantal, who was busy today making arrangements for the funeral, told the Times that she was grateful for the offer of employment from the law firm.

The young woman indicated that she was willing to take up the offer after the funeral.

In addition to the job offer from Cyril Landers and Associates, there have reportedly been offers of financial help for the bereaved daughter from others as well.

Since the story broke, there has been an outpouring of sympathy for the family.

The daughter, a former student of the Ciceron Secondary School, disclosed that she had been looking for about a year, without success,  for employment so that she could assist her suffering mother.

A relative of the suicide victim explained that everything was done for the deceased.

“We went and see her, we fed her, we did everything for her,” the relative told Radio Caribbean International (RCI) today.

According to the relative, an aunt who took the lead in caring for the deceased fell ill.

Nevertheless the relative explained that the aunt still went to see Cecilia Daniel Marshall yesterday at the family home, but Marshall was at the hospital after having consumed the corrosive substance.

“I do not want people to believe that she had no family member taking care of her,” the relative told RCI’s Timothy Poleon during today’s edition of Newsspin.

The woman explained that family members were very concerned about Marshall.

She said Marshall was very depressed.

“Even seeing her, talking to her, when she answer you can see she was depressed but we never believe she would do that. You don’t know what’s in people’s mind,” the relative said.

Asked what lesson there was from the tragedy, she said:

“I believe sometimes you ask them questions and they don’t always tell you the right thing.”

She said that relatives have  been plunged into mourning as a result of the suicide.

“We’re down,” the woman declared.

 

 

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