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USA Today:–  Tommy Fleetwood received more than $154,000 in his bank account, not a shocker since it matched the winnings for his British Open purse.

The problem: It went to the wrong Tommy Fleetwood.

The money went into the account of Orlando-area golfing pro Tommy Fleetwood, a six-figure sum that he told USA TODAY Sports popped up in his account late last week.

“I didn’t know at first where the money came from because it just appeared as a wire transfer,” said the Fleetwood who wasn’t a runner-up at this year’s U.S. Open. “When it (fully) got posted to my account, that’s when it said European PGA Tour. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out whose money it really was.”

Greg Thorner, one of Florida pro Tommy Fleetwood’s friends, posted a picture of a Wells Fargo account summary to his Twitter account Wednesday.

“I told him he should keep it,” Thorner, a golf school owner, told USA TODAY Sports.

That was never in the cards, his friend Fleetwood said.

“I was never going to keep it – unless he won $1.84 million and then I’d disappear to Canada,” Fleetwood said. “Kidding. I would have sent that back, too.”

In another example of a golfer calling a penalty on himself, Fleetwood, 58, already had contacted Wells Fargo to reverse the wire transfer before the European Tour contacted him. In an email Wednesday, the Tour included instructions on how to get the money back to the organization.

Fleetwood played in one European Tour event in 1989, but he believes the mix-up had to do with a a recent application to play in a European senior event.

The European Tour apologized to Fleetwood, the one playing this week at the PGA Championship at Bellerive, calling it a “clerical error.”

Here’s what Florida’s Fleetwood would have done with all that money had he been allowed to keep it:

“I’d probably pay off my daughter’s college payments and get a car since my car (Jaguar X-Type) has 362,000 miles on it,”  Fleetwood said. “I’m the talk of Jaguar Orlando because no Jaguar is ever supposed to last that long. I would have done that (with the money) and put the rest in the bank for retirement.”