Agriculture Minister Meets Banana Farmers

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by Anicia Antoine

Farmers in the community of Grace, Vieux Fort got an opportunity to raise awareness of the challenges they face in banana production, this time through face-to-face discussions with Agriculture Minister, Hon. Alfred Prospere.

Farmers expressed a variety of concerns, including the high cost of fertilizer and other farm inputs, as well as market access.

The minister acknowledged that the current state of the banana industry makes it difficult for farmers to produce high-quality products efficiently. He reiterated his commitment to looking into ways to assist banana farmers in improving the quality of their produce.

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Minister Prospere explained that, while it is critical to improve production standards in order to maintain international market penetration, Saint Lucians also need to show their support by purchasing and consuming local produce.

Minister Prospere expressed his intention to continue meeting with banana farmers throughout Saint Lucia in order to engage them and discuss the assistance they require from the Saint Lucian government as part of efforts to improve the quality of crops produced in Saint Lucia.

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Editorial Staff
Editorial Staff
Our Editorial Staff at St. Lucia Times is a team publishing news and other articles to over 200,000 regular monthly readers in Saint Lucia and in over 150 other countries worldwide.

3 COMMENTS

  1. @The Crow … your valid points MUST come with a business plan. I have started “the ball rolling”, but it’s still sitting on someone’s desk; but not for long. This “project” is very intricate and will take years to master – especially production and marketing. Your input in very much appreciated (we’re on the same page).

  2. @Lab. Yes, what you’ve stated is quite true (you are not the only to have this idea) however, you have to take into consideration a few things:

    1. Cost of production
    2. What your target market is
    3. What would be the production level
    4. Who are your competition
    5. What will be the price price point of the product(s)
    6. What level of government input will be expected (knowing our mentality)

    These are only a few points. But the main one is “why don’t you start the ball rolling?”

  3. It is high time to diversify the “banana product” by introducing OTHER “quality” banana products. So far, the Caribbean tradition has been to discard the banana stalk and leaves ($$ down the drains) which can be made into viable and sustainable diverse products – which will then be a proper BANANA INDUSTRY in its entirety.

    The banana stalk can, and does – with the proper, and available machinery (they do exist) – produce banana fibers which can be turned into fine threads to produce fabrics; the fruit itself can be used for condiments (essences, fertilisers, flour, breads and cakes – which we import!!), other parts of the stalk can be turned into a course fiber to produce tote bags, baskets, hats, paper, etc. The list is endless of what else the banana TREE can produce. Instead of “spinning top in mud” (searching for “markets for the fruit”) let us do what we can with the TREE.

    Take PAGES from India, Malaysia, the Philippines, some African countries – these countries have made a killing from banana tree products!! There is money to be made from that level of the BANANA INDUSTRY!!

    Unfortunately, the myopic misfits prefer to TRAVEL ($$ wasting) to other countries – searching for banana fruit markets!! Bayteez!!

Comments are closed.

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