Ministry Of Education To Review Existing Grooming Positions At Schools

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The Ministry of Education, Sustainable Development, Innovation, Science, Technology and Vocational Training is aware of situations at various schools which have sparked public discussion, as it relates to issues of grooming in schools on the island.

The Ministry wishes to assure the general public that it remains committed to reviewing the present positions with a view to addressing the current issues from a holistic standpoint.

As such, the Ministry is committed to ensuring that an evaluation of this nature includes the thorough participation of all relevant stakeholders, in determining the best way forward.

SOURCE: Ministry of Education. Headline photo courtesy: Erik Reardon (Unsplash.com).

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Editorial Staff
Editorial Staff
Our Editorial Staff at St. Lucia Times is a team publishing news and other articles to over 200,000 regular monthly readers in Saint Lucia and in over 150 other countries worldwide.

31 COMMENTS

  1. Continue to fight down the very same educational institution you all expect to create good citizens. Continue to overturn every policy or rule created to help the kids get used to complying in society.

    Then I’m going to hear…he was a good boy.

    Have you all seen the boys in town after school with their hair unkempt. Boys with earrings, tight bottom pants etc. Girls in short uniform. Let’s change all the rules.

    This has nothing to do with race. We ask the other races to cut their hair as well.

    What I see here is a bunch of parents who cannot control their kids and trying to get into please their kids.

  2. It’s high time these hair policies be revisited. I know of an incident at a school in the north where the VP makes the girls remove the edges. I found this astonishing as I’m trying to figure out since when egdes became a hindrance for learning. I feel too much emphasis is placed on hair than actually educating our children. Do braids/afros/bows prevent the kids from learning? I don’t get it. I am a mom with daughters and I have had some questionable experiences since my kids have been in school. A teacher removed my daughter’s bows saying it’s a distraction to other kids. One removed my daughter’s bows bcuz the design had a piece of leopard fabric and mind you it was the color for the school. Yet the pattern was an issue for god knows what reason. I make children I don’t make hair accessories. I personally don’t want no one touching my kids hair. Send me a note with your request instead and I will comply as I don’t want my child to be victimized. And yes victimi zing does happen at some of our schools in the north. My older daughter has bad eczema which caused her hair to break resulting in me cutting the hair. I asked the school if they would permit the braids as I didn’t want her to be teased but was denied. She got teased so much and didn’t want to go to school which was heartbreaking. I am strongly in favor of the rules being revised and I hope the ministry doesn’t procrastinate on this. Our children are fragile. The world is evolving we have to move with the times. Bullying can lead to suicide, depression, withdrawal etc. If teacher can wear stilettos to come to teach why can’t our girls have a simple braid in a bun? Why are there so many free periods in school? Where are the teachers? Why aren’t they in class? These are the things we have to look into. Parents spend money buying books why aren’t the books being utilized? This is just my opinion, agree to disagree.

  3. It’s high time these hair policies be revisited. I know of an incident at a school in the north where the VP makes the girls remove the edges. I found this astonishing as I’m trying to figure out since when egdes became a hindrance for learning. I feel too much emphasis is placed on hair than actually educating our children. Do braids/afros/bows prevent the kids from learning? I don’t get it. I am a mom with daughters and I have had some questionable experiences since my kids have been in school. A teacher removed my daughter’s bows saying it’s a distraction to other kids. One removed my daughter’s bows bcuz the design had a piece of leopard fabric and mind you it was the color for the school. Yet the pattern was an issue for god knows what reason. I make children I don’t make hair accessories. I personally don’t want no one touching my kids hair. Send me a note with your request instead and I will comply as I don’t want my child to be victimized. And yes victimi zing does happen at some of our schools in the north. My older daughter has bad eczema which caused her hair to break resulting in me cutting the hair. I asked the school if they would permit the braids as I didn’t want her to be teased but was denied. She got teased so much and didn’t want to go to school which was heartbreaking. I am strongly in favor of the rules being revised and I hope the ministry doesn’t procrastinate on this. Our children are fragile. The world is evolving we have to move with the times. Bullying can lead to suicide, depression, withdrawal etc. If teacher can wear stilettos to come to teach why can’t our girls have a simple braid in a bun? Why are there so many free periods in school? Where are the teachers? Why aren’t they in class? These are the things we have to look into. Parents spend money buying books why aren’t the books being utilized? This is just my opinion, agree to disagree.

  4. Except from the LORD :
    The angel of the LORD appeared to her and said, “You are sterile and childless, but you are going to conceive and have a son….no razor may be used on his head, because the boy is to be a Nazirite,set apart to God from birth ‼️….
    But everything is from God. Judge for yourself. Does not the very nature of things teach you that if a man has long hair,it is disgrace to him….
    If anyone wants to be contentious about this,we have no other practice- nor do the churches of God ❗

    That they may be saved. Follow my example,as I follow the example of Christ….
    Whoever loves discipline love life, but he who hates correction hates knowledge ❗

  5. After having read what the real issue was about grooming, I am ready to voice my opinion.

    Yes, indeed the school has rules and it should be followed. That is the technicality…. But these rules are rooted in its colonial mindset that says Afro hair is not ideal. If the students’ hair is a well kept Afro, I see nothing wrong with it. For too long others have tried to tell us that our hair is not the desired quality of hair. It’s time we root out this colonial mindset and be proud of our Afro. And Mary’s College must remove such an archaic, colonial oppressive rule from its books. It’s 2022 not 1922.

  6. While I agree that there is need to review the guidelines as to what is acceptable hairstyles, it baffles me that this child and his parent attended the orientation session and did not seem to have an issue where it would clearly have been spelt out as to what is acceptable and unacceptable. By showing up on the first day of school means that you did agree to follow all stipulated guidelines. End of story.

    • Rules are meant to be challenged. Had Rosa Parks not sat on that bus refusing to give up her seat to a white man, who knows, the bus system in the US may have still been segregated today.

  7. Dear parents and Ministry Officials…..there are way more pressing issues in our schools system that needs this same type of attention….like numerous safety issues that are life threatening hazards to our kids…this school near the airport with children playing where accidents happen everyday (by Jn Marie Gas station). That freaks me out!

    • I do recognize that it is a parent taking a stand on the issue. My point is that this situation was taken to court by another parent a few years ago and now we are here again. Are there no longer PTAs where student and school issues are discussed and school leaders briefed on the concerns of parents? Did the parents not review the rules of the school beforehand? Are there any other rules that infringe on the “rights” of students? Or as parents do we just not have time for that and just address situations as they come. All I am asking is that parents take a more proactive approach. We do not have to be going through this everybfew years. I know we have lost the concept of “it takes a community to raise the child” but we can do better than that.

  8. Here is my little 2 cents. Revisiting the rules should not be a Ministry of Education task only but should include parents. I think parents should take part in outlining the rules that their kids must follow while attending school i.e. what are acceptable hairstyles and hair lengths, acceptable behaviors, and dress code. Let’s see what the parents come up with. Hint Hint…. it’s not any different from the rules that are currently in place. Stop the hypocrisy.

  9. We as a people are ashamed of our heritage. Our negroid hair makes us look unkempt but when combed to look like Caucasians, it’s acceptable – how sad. Stop fighting down what is naturally ours. Focus on the quality of the education and not the hair.

    • We need to stop with this… they’re not asking for students hair to “look like Caucasians” they’re saying it needs to be NEAT. That includes combing, brushing and boys trimming the hair.
      We need to face the fact that there are rules everywhere you go which you need to abide by. Stop training our children to be so defiant. There’s a difference between standing for something worthwhile and doing as you please.

      • Are you referring to the same rules which once upon a time barred pregnant and unmarried teachers from remaining in the teaching service? The same rules which prevent Rastafarian kids from attending school. Just asking. I say again, the focus should not be on the children’s hair but on the quality of their education. Why should I cut my child’s hair because you think that it looks better in a particular way. Why should a white boy be allowed to have long hair but a black boy can’t. Why should the concept of neatness be according to your perverted standards. Tell me!! Why aren’t the kids in more developed countries considered unkempt because of their hair styles. It’s just a matter of time before these sick rules come tumbling down, through the court system or other wise.

      • @sad but true…..the point remains the students must follow the rules…you cannot compare a student to a teacher…thats why the kids have no respect….we need to stop dat…thats why crime will never stop and this nation will bleed…there are rules to follow let the kids follow them…..i believe once their hair is well kept there shud be no reason they shud be out of school….we need to see what the rasta child hair looks like before we cast all kinda judgements which lucians good for…….

    • Our stupidity has almost led us to the bottomless pit and we continue to aid our children in defiant behavior. So because I’m a negro I must keep my hair unkempt. Lord please help rearrange our stupidity cause we will be too far gone and won’t be able to turn back and save the future of our country.

      • “So because I’m a negro I must keep my hair unkempt” @ time will tell Please point out where in my comment is that articulated. I repeat – one’s hair style does not have to be flat to be considered neat. Change is coming!! It is inevitable.

  10. This university or school system should be ashamed of themselves and demeritted, how can an institute at this day and age especially in the Caribbean get on like this…… a 13 year olds hair! Please! SmPH Focus on what’s important for Gods Sake.!. This is shameful for St. Lucia in 2023 almost!

  11. lol lol c-wiz i understand you…..I myself had to read the headlines many times before I could actually understand it…the difference is I never understood til I read the article….Anyways I believe the kids should be neatly groomed….A rasta child can have his hair wrapped up in a head band or something fine by me…..I believe girls should not be wearing braids to school….I fine we let too many things slide with our kids that why its hard to control them….Trust me the schools are feeling the blow of their behaviour…Anyways SLT come better than that

  12. This is a response to a situation @ SMC where a student was denied access to classes yesterday because his hair was not cut. Black boys must cut their hair flat to be considered well groomed, whereas young men from other races are considered trendy while wearing long hair. What is this, another extension of the colonialism mindset? Tone down on anything black, because black is ugly? Nonsense.

    • You are INCORRECT! The rule at SMC applies to ALL students irrespective of race, colour or creed. Let’s stop making this about black empowerment because this is NOT what this is about. It is about rules that need to be adhered to. If you want to challenge the rule, by all means do so, but in a proper manner. Don’t be defiant and then challenge. We parents make it difficult for teachers and then we blame those same teachers when our children become lawless.

      • I went to SMC graduated in 2020 and I can tell that those rules don’t apply to the asian and caucasian boys, even at graduation me and the other black boys with long hair were harassed and told to cover it when there were non black boys who were fine by their standards. There is no correlation between hairstyles and education, this is just an extension of colonialism. Why should young black men have to cut their hair, it grows from his scalp like anyone else. Girls sometimes suffer from breakage and need to cut their hair in order to grow it properly, but aren’t allowed to put in braids during that period, which leads to intense BULLYING. You know how brutal kids are and how girls with short hair are viewed. Why are the Caribbean and Africa the only places on earth which still have these ridiculous hair policies in school and the workplace. The 2 places which are predominantly black. It’s a remant of slavery and colonialism and needs to be reviewed and changed. Good Day

  13. This issue came about because a lawyer’s son was kick out of class on the first day of school because of the manner in which he had his hair( big afro). SLT keeps writing vague articles.

    • oh really. so what was wrong with the boys afro? isn’t having an afro linked to our african or saint lucian heritage? If you look at our grand fathers in their time afro was the style so what is or was so wrong now the child cant wear his hair in an afro once it is neatly kept? to tell you the honest truth its true you have to follow rules but rule makers need to put rules that actually makes sense and serves a purpose and not to serve their own personal agenda.

      in the early or late 90’s up into the 2000’s it was ok to wear a large bottom right? every boy and man had this, all of a sudden the schools then in the 2000’s were telling boys it was unacceptable to have their pants this large, ok thats fine, now we in the time of skinny jeans, now the boys are wearing their pants with a small bottom they are now telling them this to is unacceptable, now I am not talking about the ones that are extremely tight some of you fellas were really overdoing it, I just talking about having the bottom slightly smaller. I can assure you in the time of large bottom if a boy had come to school with a smaller bottom it would not have been a problem the only thing is he would have been laughed at by other boys and said he was wearing a “CHI CHIT BOU” (those who went to school in the era would know the phrase) .

      I wonder if they bring back large bottoms now what they would say? so if it was not a problem then so why should it be a problem now? all these rules needs to revamped and are archaic, these rules were most likely there from the Catholic church cause in those days before it was the catholic church that was running alot of things and I believe we only had Saint Mary’s College and the Convent as the only schools at the time which are catholic schools ran by Nuns and Priests and all these old catholic rules are from England so when our forefathers were made slaves this is most likely what they even had to follow so you see how it trends down.

      All things like saying boys cant cornrow their hair or have plats if they choose to in this time is irrelevant. Is it going to hinder his progress at school? Does it mean that he is affiliated with the gangster life style because he has cornrows? What is the purpose and meaningful reason they cant have it other than it being a rule? wearing your hair short is a hair style , having your head bald is a hair style so why cant cornrows for boys be a hairstyle which is what it just is, a hair style.

      I am not sure if this is still a issue now but back in the day certain schools had wearing a white t shirt under your school shirt as part of the uniform, other schools they would make you remove it and tell you oh its not part of the uniform especially if you wore a printed or colored T shirt you have to wear a vest and the main reason the boys wore the t shirts is cause just having the vest serves no justice in preventing your school shirt from getting sweat. Now a certain school at the time which had a sensible principal said ok you guys want to wear t shirt you can wear your white t shirt but no colored shirts and no shirts with prints on them and that was it. Up to this day this new rule is being kept. The principle at the time realized that the no t shirt rule was not making sense and children still were coming with different t shirts.

  14. Dear editor,

    Your instant grabbing headline threw me a curved ball on first reading. I therefore had to read it again, and then again a third time to ensure I got it right. On first and second reading I got the impression that some tutors we grooming students in schools (a form of inappropriate behaviour towards students) and neither did I see the photo of the barber with his trimmer cutting someone’s hair. I dear say, never have I ever been thrown off my perch like the way I did after reading this headline. Even more, my coffee was the victim of projectile spewing while I fell of my perch. I must admit that is some clever editing. Bravo to you.

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