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PAHO Reports Spike In Diabetes Cases In The Americas

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Growing rates of obesity, poor diets, and lack of physical activity, among other factors, have contributed to a more than three-fold increase in the number of adults living with diabetes in the Americas in the past 30 years according to a new report by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

The PAHO Panorama of Diabetes in the Americas, released in the run up to World Diabetes Day (November 14) calls on countries to improve early diagnosis, increase access to quality care for diabetes control, and develop strategies to promote healthy lifestyles and nutrition.

At least 62 million people live with diabetes in the Americas, a number which is expected to be much higher given that around 40% of those with the disease are unaware they have the condition.

If current trends continue, the number of people with diabetes in the region is projected to reach 109 million by 2040.

The increase in cases of diabetes over three decades is linked to an increase in risk factors – Two-thirds of adults in the Americas are overweight or obese, and only 60% get enough exercise. The report also points to an alarming trend among young people in the region: over 30% are now considered to be obese or overweight – almost double the global average.

“These high rates of diabetes highlight the urgent need for countries to focus on prevention and the promotion of healthy lifestyles,” said Dr. Anselm Hennis, Director of the Department of Non-communicable Diseases and Mental Health at PAHO.

“At the same time, it is crucial to ensure early diagnosis and good disease management, which are key to controlling diabetes and preventing diabetes-related disability and poor health.”

The report shows, however, that just 12 countries in the region have the six basic technologies required for the management of diabetes in public health facilities, including equipment for measuring blood glucose, tests for the early diagnosis of complications, and urine test strips for glucose and ketone analysis.

“It is crucial that everyone, everywhere has access to these basic diagnosis and management tools needed to prevent related disability,” Dr. Hennis added.

The report also notes that people with diabetes have higher risks for severe forms of COVID-19 and death, highlighting the importance of integrating diabetes care into preparedness and response plans for emergencies.

In order to reduce the prevalence of the disease and enable those with diabetes to lead healthier lives and avoid complications, the report calls on countries to:

  • Improve the capacity for early diagnosis of diabetes and for the prevention of diabetes-related complications;
  • Increase availability and access to quality diabetes care, including essential medicines such as insulin, glucose-monitoring devices, and self-management support;
  • Build strategies and policies to promote healthy lifestyles and nutrition and prevent obesity.
  • Strengthen surveillance and monitoring to ensure good diabetes control.

SOURCE: Pan American Health Organization/SLT

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1 COMMENT

  1. Dear PAHO, our ability to address a future health crisis is being severely hampered presently. We as student nurses in the Department of Nursing at SALCC are being emotionally and financially affected by the administration of that department. In my opinion I belive every effort is being made by the administration of the Nursing Department at SALCC to convert us into patients rather than qualified nurses. I am also inclined to believe that such an overt objective is supported by SALCC administration. Why? Because we as students(majority women) have been crying out for held and no one is assisting such a vulnerable population. Therefore, we do politely request your professional assistance. Thank you kindly.

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