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Protesting BOSL Employees Back On The Job

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Managing Director Rolf Phillips announced Friday that Protesting Bank of Saint Lucia (BOSL) employees were back on the job.

“Our dedicated team is now back at work, diligently addressing any outstanding matters to ensure a seamless return to full operations,” Phillips said in an email to Bank customers.

On behalf of BOSL’s Chairman, the Board of Directors, and the Management of the Bank of Saint Lucia, he expressed heartfelt gratitude for customers’ patience and understanding during the recent industrial action.

“We acknowledge the inconvenience and disruption caused by limited services and closure of some of our branches, including customer service and lending services, over the past four days. We deeply regret any difficulties you may have faced during this time,” Phillips wrote.

“Your continued trust and loyalty are of utmost importance to us. We are committed to restoring our services to the high standards you expect and deserve,” the BOSL Managing Director stated.

He also disclosed that the financial institution was taking steps to prevent similar disruptions in the future.

BOSL employees, represented by the National Workers Union (NWU), began their protest demanding action against a senior manager over allegations of victimization, fraud and other issues.

According to reports, the disgruntled employees have received assurances of a fair, transparent, and independent investigation into their concerns.

News of the employees’ return to work should come as a relief to irate customers.

The customers had complained bitterly about the inconvenience caused by the disruption in BOSL’s services, and some even called for a national boycott of the lending institution by taking their business to credit unions.

Earlier this week, when reporters raised the bank protest during a press briefing, Prime Minister Philip J. Pierre declared that BOSL is a private institution with its laws and Board of Directors.

“We are hoping that good sense would prevail. If there is a labour issue, then the Bank has to go through the formal channels, ” the Finance Minister stated.

Pierre said the government believed that all sides should show maturity because the country’s people were suffering.

 

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4 COMMENTS

  1. What a crock!!! This is a Publicly traded company, with the Government holding the majority of the shares. This could have and should have been solved before reaching to stage it did. Disappointed.

  2. Anonymous false. Government only has 20% share. If you are going to share, get the publicly available information. I agree that it should not have gotten to this stage, the Board and Leadership have been way too complacent with this Senior HR Manager. Wake up and take action!

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